Much has been written about the familial bond that alt-pop four-piece Tigertown have with one other.

Consisting of husband and wife duo Chris and Charlie Collins, Chris’s brother Alexi and sister Elodie [Crowe], the family relationship features prominently in the band’s setup. “As a band it’s always complex,” says Alexi of this dynamic, “and it might be a little more because it’s family, but I think we’re also better at solving things quicker.”

Part of this ability to resolve issues faster also comes from each member’s previous musical experience: “Before we started Tigertown we all played in separate bands,” Alexi continues, “so we already knew what it’s like, but there’s something a lot more relaxing when it’s with your family.”

Coming from a similar background also helps them reach a consensus on the band’s sound and direction. “Having four vocalists that blend well together is definitely helpful. Plus, Chris, Elodie and I grew up listening to the same music, so we probably agree on more things.”

Despite this, there is always the risk of their work in the band bleeding through to their personal relationships, particularly for Chris and Charlie. “They definitely have to set boundaries between work and family life, and for us as siblings when we’re with our mum we have to limit the conversation a little bit. But it definitely bleeds over; we’re not strict on it,” he laughs.

Following in the footsteps of 2016’s EPs Lonely Cities and Papernote, Tigertown’s new single Warriors continues the style of upbeat, anthemic yet emotionally resonant pop. As Alexi explains “with Lonely Cities and Papernote we found that real party vibe, with lots of group singing and things like that, and that’s kind of the sound we really learned to make our own and learned to love. So when we were producing Warriors we were insistent that we include that kind of sound, particularly in the chorus with that singalong feeling.”

The song itself deals with the theme of dreams and expectations not living up to reality, something that Alexi describes as a general observation on the world. “Obviously it’s inspired by working in the [music] industry,” he explains, “but it’s more of a general concept than based on any specific experiences.” A concept that many could relate to. “And that’s what pop music is meant to do: be relatable” adds Alexi.

The song itself deals with the theme of dreams and expectations not living up to reality, something that Alexi describes as a general observation on the world. “Obviously it’s inspired by working in the [music] industry,” he explains, “but it’s more of a general concept than based on any specific experiences.” A concept that many could relate to. “And that’s what pop music is meant to do; be relatable,” he adds.

Recently, Tigertown has completed a tour supporting Tove Lo, which appears to have brought the band some new fans. “People who didn’t know us seemed to be very accepting and welcoming, which is always the trick for an opening band, to have them embrace you like that. It was a really great crowd.”

As they prepare for an upcoming US tour supporting VÉRITÉ later this month, Tigertown also appears to be making a name for themselves overseas. “It’s really exciting,” says Alexi, “We’re not getting regularly recognised in the streets or anything like that, but it’s an exciting feeling that we can go over there and people know our songs and want to hear us.”

As for the future, Tigertown have some new material to be released soon. “We’ve got an album ready to go,” reveals Alexi. “I think in the not-too-distant future it’ll be out and about. That’s what Warriors is leading into. It’ll have some of the older songs on it as well, but Warriors is probably a good representation of what the album will sound like.”