Tuesday 5 September

20:00 – Horace Bones, The Zoo, Lachie
Horace Bones had a super-high energy that punched you in the face as they opened the night at The Zoo.

Their new track Sex Pistol seemed a bit off on the lower notes, but singer Oisin Kelly made up for it when he kicked into the high energy chorus. The crowd that was there were really involved and loving the energy. Although the slower, low-energy parts of the set seemed to drag on for a while, they worked to greatly enhance the bigger, higher-impact sections even more. With their huge Aussie-punk spoken word sound, this unique act is sure to make waves.

20:20 – Didirri, Laruche, Freya
Didirri’s explosive vocals swallowed Laruche as he opened our first official night at BIGSOUND. Raw and heart-achingly personal, his songs bleed with an unconscious vulnerability. The air was thick with awe and wonder, however there is definitely room for him to expand his act to include a band. While his solo acoustic guitar does have beautiful resonance, there is space for his powerful vocals to be brought to an entirely new level. Allowing us to be privy to some of his most personal and intimate experiences, here is an artist who truly leaves nothing at the door. I can’t wait to see more of what he does in the future.

While his solo acoustic guitar does have beautiful resonance, there is space for his powerful vocals to be brought to an entirely new level. Allowing us to be privy to some of his most personal and intimate experiences, here is an artist who truly leaves nothing at the door. I can’t wait to see more of what he does in the future.

20:50 – PLTS, The Zoo, Lachie
PLTS are a super-tight rock band that have supported the likes of Hands Like Houses and The Amity Affliction and yet do not possess the same hardcore vocal sound at all. Instead, Kit Bray’s vocals charm the crowd over the intense rock instrumentation, putting this band in a genre that doesn’t get enough recognition in this country, ‘feel good, dirty, commercial rock’. The music and songwriting is great and fills a gap with a sound that the Australian music scene seem to rarely get behind.

The band, unfortunately, were lacking a little in the stage presence department. They failed to fully engage with the crowd who really seemed to want to interact more with the band. A lack of energy coming from the stage makes this hard.

21:00 – West Thebarton, The Brightside Outdoor Stage, Freya
The Brightside was filled to the brim as South Australian powerhouses West Thebarton took to the stage. Shudderingly wild, these guys know how to captivate an audience. With the exception of a slightly sloppy microphone issue halfway through, frontman Ray Dalfsen was furious and demanding of attention. At one point leaping aboard the side speakers and using them as a pulpit for his sermon. No one can deny that West Thebarton are deserving of far larger stages than the ones they have taken to up until now.

At one point leaping aboard the side speakers and using them as a pulpit for his sermon. No one can deny that West Thebarton are deserving of far larger stages than the ones they have taken to up until now.

21:40 – Pandamic, The Zoo, Lachie
“How yas goin?” A classic opening statement from a fresh garage-rock band keen to get their name out there. You can tell these dudes are having the time of their lives. The drummer, Rangi Barnes rocks the circle hair and brings all eyes on the drums, which is clearly the most important part of any band.

They clearly love playing and rocking out super-hard. They have their ratbag moments but they’ve also got their beautiful moments and it’s lovely to see a bit of diversity. They’re a little inexperienced and need some better gear, but these guys are on the up. Super excited to see where things go from here!

21:50 – DOBBY, The Elephant Hotel, Lachie
The slick, quick styles of DOBBY’s rhymes would impress any music punter that happened to stumble into The Elephant Hotel. But when he jumps behind the drums and plays the beats while rapping over it, you know you’ve walked into something really unique. His rhymes are super-smooth and super-quick in moments. He goes between rapping over pre-recorded beats, to beat-boxing, to playing the beats live on a pad, and also on the drums. He is the most diverse Aussie hip hop artist I have ever seen. Make sure you check him out as soon as you can!

His rhymes are super-smooth and super-quick in moments. He goes between rapping over pre-recorded beats, to beat-boxing, to playing the beats live on a pad, and also on the drums. He is the most diverse Aussie hip hop artist I have ever seen. Make sure you check him out as soon as you can!

21:50 – Good Boy, The Brightside Outdoor Stage, Freya
Taking to the stage after West Thebarton was no small feat. However, Brisbane locals Good Boy gave a show worthy of attention. Despite coming off a little shaky, they brought the crowd in close. Sporting merch from mates Big White and Pist Idiots, the three piece wrapped up the set with crowd favourite Poverty Line. Having seen these guys absolutely slay at Oxford Art Factory earlier in the year, I had high expectations. Somehow I feel like they might not be quite ready for the stage they were on tonight, but

Having seen these guys absolutely slay at Oxford Art Factory earlier in the year, I had high expectations. Somehow I feel like they might not be quite ready for the stage they were on tonight, but nonetheless they were loud, proud and full of excited energy.

22:00 – Machine Age, The Foundry, Brynn
Machine Age exploded with energy on The Foundry stage, seamlessly combining throbbing base and synth, distorted electric guitar and live drums melting between. The subs worked in overdrive, drowning out the industry meet-and-greet chatter, with Adrian Mauro’s rich voice in perfect balance. Elements of classic rock’n’roll’s emphasis on songwriting and structure

Elements of classic rock’n’roll’s emphasis on songwriting and structure woven through his electronic inflections resulted in a serious case of banging heads and stomping feet. Definitely one to watch.

22:40 –  Ziggy Ramo, The Elephant Hotel, Freya
Ziggy Ramo has left BIGSOUND in the dust. Articulate and poised, he has managed to traverse punk, hip hop, funk and soul and in doing so casting light on the corners of our country’s cultural conversations which are kept silent. Showcasing a bunch of new tracks, which will likely appear on his next record, his music explores Indigenous deaths in custody, women’s rights and mental health. It really was a powerful set to be a part of.

Backed by his phenomenal band The Love, the frontman was overcome by his own earth-shattering performance, at times collapsing in fury and ecstasy. Dedicating every song to the people whose story he is connecting with, Ramo is humble, wildly intelligent and boldly himself. He and his band are without a doubt an act who speaks for an entire generation of Australians. I challenge anyone who has been privy to their music to say that Ziggy Ramo and The Love are not set to be one of the most valuable musical acts this country has known.

23:30 – Dear Seattle, Oh Hello!, Brynn

“Testing, onetwo, CHECK!” Brae Fisher barked into the microphone. I braced myself – the sound guys weren’t going to turn anything down and I moved to the back with not a second to spare. If I hadn’t found earbuds within 30 seconds, I may still be in shell shock from the face-melting wall of sound booming from the towers into the cavernous room housing the triple j Unearthed stage.

Dear Seattle play hard, loud and with more unencumbered joy and enthusiasm than I’ve seen in a long time. I may be the old fart wanting the desk to bring it all down a few notches, but the punters in the front were revelling in the noise. Playing tracks from The Meadows EP, Brae, Lachlan and Jeremy head-banged in unison – guitar necks neatly missing one another – while fans in the front whipped their hair back and forth like they were in a heavy-metal shampoo commercial.

Live, the raw garage element of Dear Seattle’s quintessential indie-rock reveals itself, and with grins stretched across from ear to ear, clearly loving every second, they are a highly engaging and incredibly likeable act to watch.